Skip to Content

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: June 6, 2015 5:01:06 PM PDT

Members from the Refugio Oil Spill Response shoreline cleanup and assessment team survey a beach line in the vicinity of Goleta Beach, which was impacted by the Refugio Oil spill near Santa Barbara, Calif., June 6, 2015. These teams are trained in how to evaluate oil conditions, determine means for cleanup, identify sensitive resources as well as place constraints on cleanup if necessary, due to ecological, economic, or cultural concerns. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Klingenberg)

Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique teams, made up of scientists trained in evaluating oil coverage on shorelines, survey beaches and report on their status. The survey results drive where cleanup operations will occur. Survey work includes looking Different tools are used by Refugio Oil Spill Response shoreline cleanup crews to clean the oil off of rocks on Refugio Beach near Santa Barbara, Calif., June 6, 2015. These crews work long hours to safely and efficiently return the beach to its former state. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Klingenberg)at the high and low tide areas, examining the area below the sand, down to two feet, and checking all of the rock and other beach structures for oiling. For the Southern California area, natural seeps are part of the natural state of the environment. Once the beaches are signed off they will return to their natural state that includes the presence of tar and oil from natural seeps.

SCAT teams for the Refugio Incident reported 12 sections of shoreline from Santa Barbara Harbor to Rincon Point met cleanup goals.

A member of the Refugio Oil Spill Response shoreline cleanup clean-up crew removes oil from a rock at Refugio Beach State Park near Santa Barbara, Calif., June 6, 2015. Several of these cleaning crew have been assigned to different beaches to ensure an efficient and safe response effort. (U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Klingenberg)

           These goals include:

  • Coastal cliffs have no more than 10 percent oil stain or coat over the entire survey area;
  • Gravel, including cobblestones, has less than 10 percent coverage over the entire survey area;
  • The surveyed area contains one percent or less of tar balls, tar patties, or tar mats on sandy beaches;
  •  No oil found two feet below the surface of gravel and sand;
  • Boulders, bedrock, seawall, pier structure and rip-rap, stone or material used to reinforce shores or banks, have no more than 10 percent oil over the entire survey area, and produce a sheen.
Team members of the Refugio Oil Spill Response shoreline cleanup crews work along the Refugio Beach tidal rock-line to clean oil away from the rocks during the Refugio Oil Spill response near Santa Barbara, Calif., June 6, 2015. The oil on the rocks were caused after an inland oil pipeline ruptured and made its way down to the nearby ocean. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Jonathan Klingenberg)

For more information contact:

Joint Information Center
(805) 770-3682
www.refugioresponse.com
reply@refugioresponse.com